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Old 05-01-2017, 12:48 PM   #401
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i don't have this particular bird but a couple of delta darts do grace my collection. they're not the most elegant of birds but they're endearing in their own way. once again, interesting write up, monsieur richtoffen. do you contribute to some mags? i do look forward to your writings....
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Old 05-01-2017, 03:52 PM   #402
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once again, interesting write up, monsieur richtoffen. do you contribute to some mags? i do look forward to your writings....
Thanks, tomcatter. And no, I don't contribute to mags--but I do read a few.
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Old 05-01-2017, 09:53 PM   #403
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Thanks, tomcatter. And no, I don't contribute to mags--but I do read a few.
it's always nice to read your writings, monsieur richstofen. and it's good to see that you're covering models which are available instead of making me hunt for 0/5 availables
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Old 05-01-2017, 10:27 PM   #404
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Lots of good write ups Richthofen, been a great run recently!
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Old 05-02-2017, 11:06 AM   #405
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No question, the North American P-51 Mustang became THE supreme symbol of American air power in World War Two. It was nimble, lightning-fast, lethal; it carried the war to the enemy's doorstep like no other fighter could—wresting control of European and Pacific skies. Few dispute that. But in reality it was the beastly Republic P-47 Thunderbolt (or "Jug") that did the real heavy-weight pummeling, punching opposing fighters and ground targets right off their evil Axis feet. Republic produced more than 15,600 Thunderbolts between 1941 and 1945 that served in every theater of the war performing a range of missions from bomber escort to close air support.

Would you believe the P-47 was supposed to be a ‘light’ fighter? Yep, it was. Alexander Kartveli, the Georgian-born aircraft designer, originally intended the P-47 to be a featherweight interceptor based on the small P-43 Lancer (which saw limited service in the U.S. Army Air Corps before 1941). It was meant to be an improved version of the fighter, but the war in Europe made it clear a much more rugged, tougher machine was needed. In response, Republic rolled out a prototype Thunderbolt on May 6, 1941.

The P-47 was gargantuan by anybody’s standard. It was three feet wider than the P-51 and four feet longer. And at more than 10,000 pounds empty, it was about 50 percent heavier than the Mustang and nearly twice the weight of of the Supermarine Spitfire. In fact, along with the three-seat Grumman Avenger, the P-47 was among the heaviest single-engine aircraft of the war. Despite its considerable mass, the P-47’s 18-cylinder, 2,600-horsepower Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine (the same power plant used by the Vought Corsair and Grumman Hellcat) enabled the Jug to keep pace with the Mustang: both had a top speed of around 440 mph (700 km/h). But while the P-47 could reach altitudes in excess of 40,000 feet (12,000 meters), it lacked the Mustang’s legs, able to stay aloft only 800 miles (1,300 km), half the P-51's distance.

Still, the beast packed a wicked punch. With four .50 caliber machine guns installed in each wing, the Thunderbolt could (and did) mince enemy warplanes and armor alike. Its internal stores held 3,400 rounds (compared to the Mustang’s 1,800 bullets), enabling the P-47 to fire a torrent of lead for 30 seconds straight. Get caught in its crosshairs and you were a dead duck.

Admittedly, the Jug couldn’t out-turn more nimble fighters; but it could “bounce” them, guns blazing, and rip their wings off. As a ground attack aircraft it was superb, capable of hefting 3,000 pounds of external ordnance. In fact, when fully armed, a P-47 Thunderbolt could deliver roughly half the payload of a B-17 Flying Fortress. And when equipped with 4.5-inch M8 rockets, the Jug had the firepower equal to a battery of 105 mm howitzers. Not to mention it was tough to kill. Not only did it absorb stupefying amounts of punishment, the cockpit was capacious and comfy, several fliers likening the seat to a lounge chair. And the bubble canopy, standard on D-model variants, provided a clear, panoramic view. And get this … the plane’s safety record was absolutely astonishing: only about 0.7 percent of Thunderbolts were lost in action. Pretty cool, huh?

The downside was, P-47s weren’t cheap. Republic Aviation factories in Long Island, New York and in Evansville, Indiana, along with a Curtis plant in Buffalo, assembled 15,600 Thunderbolts between 1942 and 1945—an average of 360 a month for three and a half years. Each plane cost $85,000 (about $1.4 million in 2017). All told, the War Department spent $1.2 billion on P-47 Thunderbolts before VJ Day. That’s roughly $15.8 billion today. But they were worth every penny. The P-47 made its combat debut in April 1943, when a Thunderbolt with the U.S. Army’s 4th Fighter Group obliterated a Focke Wulf Fw-190 over France. Over the next two years, the planes would claim nearly 4,000 enemy aircraft, 9,000 trains, 86,000 trucks, and 6,000 armored vehicles. The Mustang can’t make that claim.

Many aces preferred the Thunderbolt, too. A number of American aces achieved impressive records in the P-47, including Francis “Gabby” Gabreski (28 kills), Robert S. Johnson (27 kills) and David C. Schilling (22.5 kills).

With time and improvements, P-47s broke speed records. One experimental model set a speed record of 505 mph (810 km/h), which no piston engine aircraft beat until 1989. In 1942, Republic reported it had broken the then-elusive ‘sound barrier’ during P-47 dive tests, though some authorities question the claim. Two years later, the company produced a limited number of M model Thunderbolts with supercharged engines that reached emergency speeds of 473 mph (760 km/h). These were deployed to England to intercept V1 rockets and were later used against German jets.

So yeah, the P-47 Thunderbolt was Da Bomb! The United States principally flew the Jug, but Thunderbolts also served in the RAF (800), Free France (500), and the Soviet Union under Lend Lease (400), where they served mainly in interceptor roles.

Eat that, Mustang lovers!





I absolutely groove on Corgi's P-47 Thunderbolts (love those semi-blown cowl flaps). They've definitely got the look of this strapping, powerful warbird and deserve a place in your WWII collection. If you don't own one yet, be sure to snatch this puppy.




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Old 05-02-2017, 11:04 PM   #406
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i've got the first two hobbymaster jugs and they're absolute beasts! no idea how corgi's tooling is in comparison, though.

i have to admit the jugs do not have the sort of visual appeal the mustangs do. they look clunky. but a fellow collector got me drawn into ww2 birds and i guess no ww2 collection would be complete without a jug in the collection (i'm still looking/waiting for a 48 scale warhawk i like). i'm partial towards the silver birds (hence, mayo's bird in my collection), and would also have liked to add eagleston's... but am holding out for a razorback that appeals to me for a better representation in my collection. i'm keeping my fingers crossed that hobbymaster would do this someday:

Gone but Not Forgotten-91f1373a6866027b1410f5e10c573950.jpg
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Old 05-03-2017, 03:05 AM   #407
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I love the Jug - what a beast!

I don't actually own any models of the type though. They don't really fit any of my themes, more's the pity as I am really trying to not start any new themes lest I feel compelled to complete them

I may have to bend that guideline for the P-47 though..
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Old 05-03-2017, 04:39 AM   #408
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I love the Jug - what a beast!

I don't actually own any models of the type though. They don't really fit any of my themes, more's the pity as I am really trying to not start any new themes lest I feel compelled to complete them

I may have to bend that guideline for the P-47 though..
you should. mayo's is a good start... either corgi's or hobbymaster's. i'm guessing it's between a 0-1/5 availability. difficult to hunt down, but not impossible.
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Old 05-03-2017, 11:08 PM   #409
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i've got the first two hobbymaster jugs and they're absolute beasts! no idea how corgi's tooling is in comparison, though.

i have to admit the jugs do not have the sort of visual appeal the mustangs do. they look clunky. but a fellow collector got me drawn into ww2 birds and i guess no ww2 collection would be complete without a jug in the collection (i'm still looking/waiting for a 48 scale warhawk i like). i'm partial towards the silver birds (hence, mayo's bird in my collection), and would also have liked to add eagleston's... but am holding out for a razorback that appeals to me for a better representation in my collection. i'm keeping my fingers crossed that hobbymaster would do this someday:

Attachment 252145
Will this do:



It's announced on HMC..
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Old 05-03-2017, 11:15 PM   #410
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Will this do:
close, but not quite
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Old 05-05-2017, 12:42 PM   #411
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Davet Charbonneau, visiting his aunt in Dudelange, Luxembourg, was terrified when something hideous screamed from the sky and tried to kill him. Shrieking planes plummeted like demonic vultures and dropped their iron bombs all around him, his aunt’s building exploding into kindling and flying brick. It wasn’t until years later that he learned the pterodactyl-like planes were Stukas. Few if any symbols better symbolized the German Blitzkrieg than the Ju-87 Sturzkampfflugzeug
. The notorious single-engine, two-man dive-bomber’s iconic gull wings and spatted undercarriage are as distinctive as the plane’s bloodcurdling, instantly recognizable siren, dubbed the “Jericho Trumpet” ( listen to it here).

It started in September 1st, 1939, when Stabsfeldwebel Helmut Schäfer thought it would be hilarious if he affixed two crude wooden propellers to one of his squadron’s Stukas. But rather than getting a laugh from it, he was totally gobsmacked when the crew returned with gushing praise, explaining the propellers had produced a high-pitched screech so terrifying it scattered the enemy in panic. Other Stuka pilots wanted them, too, prompting Junkers to produce a proper kit, which ground crews attached in the field.

Most Sturzkampfgeschwaders (squadrons of Ju-87s) with sirens scared the ding-dong out of Allied troops, though not all Stuka pilots cherished the contraptions. In fact, eventually most Ju-87 pilots grew to hate them for good reason: The problem was, pilots couldn’t switch them off, at least the earliest types, which meant Ju-87 crews had to endure the ear-splitting racket through entire missions. Though Junkers later addressed this issue, the damage was done, and nobody wanted the cursed things on their planes. But that wasn’t the only concern. The miniature propellers not only impeded the warbird’s top speed, but they also tended to shear off during turns and dive recovery; consequently, after 1941, most Ju-87 crews ditched them entirely. Still, the Stuka’s reputation had become so fearsome, terrified enemy troops took to calling the dive bomber “Jericho’s Trumpet.” To boost this notoriety further, some Stuka squadrons attached kids’ whistles to the warbird’s general-purpose 250 kg (500 lb) bombs, which produced their own spine-chilling squeals.

It’s relatively hard to judge the devastating psychological impact these sirens provoked, but it’s safe to say they were shattering. French General Edouard Ruby is quoted as saying, “…they (French Artillerymen) simply stopped firing and went to the ground; the infantry cowered in the trenches, dazed by the crash of the bombs and the shriek of the dive-bombers. Should a clutch of Stukas appear, men soiled their fatigues in unison.”

The Stuka was more than just a terror weapon: its knack for obliterating Polish and French defenders with staggering precision made it a formidable war machine. In fact, some historians argue that the Ju 87 facilitated Germany’s initial Blitzkrieg victories. So you’ve gotta ask: Would the Stuka have been as successful without its sirens? The answer is: Yes and no. It would have destroyed just as many targets, but it wouldn’t have struck as much dread in Polish and French hearts, and men wouldn’t have pooped their pants nearly as much.



Guys, whatever you do, don’t miss out on this particular Corgi Stuka (AA32502). It’s missing siren propellers, but she wears some intriguing tropical camouflage with a sinister snake motif. This bird flew in Libya and knocked out sixteen 7th Armoured Division tanks along with a number of lorries and personnel before a Hawker Hurricane nailed her tukas. The model’s a keeper.


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Old 05-08-2017, 11:55 AM   #412
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During the early days of Operation Barbarossa (Germany’s invasion of Soviet Russia), Hitler’s boys appeared absolutely invincible, kicking the Russians in the balls big-time, stomping army after Soviet army into oblivion. Stalin’s air forces fared no better, the Luftwaffe annihilating vast numbers of Russian aircraft on the ground (and in the air). The Soviets couldn’t detect incoming raids early enough to respond, which didn’t matter anyway ‘cause German forces overran their forward bases too fast for them to reply.

In London, Churchill was overjoyed at Hitler’s outright blunder. The Nazi tyrant hadn’t finished the fight against the British Empire yet was taking on millions of infuriated Soviet soldiers. The Prime Minister was certain Russia would, in due course, rise up and maul its enemy like a bear. But that wouldn’t happen until the communist beast was armed to the teeth.

Enter Britain and America. Both countries understood Russia’s vital role in defeating Germany and were prepared to provision it. But Churchill loathed Stalin; in fact, Churchill bitterly opposed Moscow and Communism at large, but Nazi Germany posed the more immediate threat. So swallowing his misgivings and working on the principle of the enemy of my enemy is my friend, Churchill offered vital war material to Stalin, which the Russian despot accepted with nary a thanks. What the Soviets needed most were competent fighters to brawl with the Luftwaffe as the nation relocated its manufacturing facilities beyond German reach. So Churchill sent Uncle Joe a bevy of Hawker Hurricanes and Supermarine Spitfires via the perilous Arctic route to shore up shattered Soviet fighter regiments. To augment that, several RAF squadrons fought alongside the Soviets.

Given the Hurricane’s and Spitfire’s popularity in England, you’d think Soviet pilots would love them too; but ironically, they didn’t. In fact, Russian pilots mostly disliked their British mounts—intensely. They expressly condemned the Spitfire for its narrow undercarriage, which made landing on poorly prepared Soviet runways downright hazardous. Plus they considered the warbird too fragile for Russia’s rigorous conditions—in contrast to the Hurricane that was far more sturdy and better suited to Soviet ground-attack tactics. Russian pilots complained, too, that British fighters were too lightly armed, plus their machine guns were was located in the wings, not clustered around the forward fuselage as on Soviet and German fighters. Concentrated nose fire, Stalin’s boys insisted, was far more effective.

Criticisms notwithstanding, the Russians also knew these two fighters were far superior to most of the types they flew, especially the I-152 biplane still in service. To improve these newly acquired fighters’ performance further, they modified many of the 2,952 Hurricanes in the field. The Soviets absolutely abhorred the Hurricane’s eight .303 Browning machine guns, which were too feeble to defeat German cockpit armor and self-sealing fuel tanks. When the Brits later armed the Hurricane Mk.II with four Hispano 20mm cannons, the Ruskies took note and likewise modified their earlier variants.

The Russians looked to aero-gun designer B.G. Shpital’nyj from the Yakovlev design bureau to fabricate alternative weapon packages for the Hurricane. He eventually settled on 4x 20 mm ShVAK cannons, 2x 7.7 mm ShKAS machine-guns, and 6x RS-82 ground attack rockets to meet the fighter’s new ground-attack role. As well as packing a harder punch, the new Soviet armament also eased logistic concerns since replacement parts were far more obtainable. Ground personnel made other field upgrades depending on what was available.

These “upgrades,” however, were a Catch-22. The heavier armament added extra weight to the fighter that ultimately reduced its performance, which forced the Russians to use the Hurricane more in ground attack, which forced their pilots to avoid German fighters altogether. This provoked an escalating chorus of protests that the warbird was a deathtrap for lack of pilot and engine protection—in contrast to the Il-2 Shturmovik. Which in turn encouraged more armor, which further crippled performance, which increased Soviet complaints.

Since the Hurricane handled differently from equivalent Soviet designs, the need arose for a two-seater trainer version. Resourceful ground crew converted ten Hurricane Mk.IIs, which required removal of the canopy and the fitting of a second, duplicate cockpit with windscreen. The extra weight necessitated the elimination of eight of the Mk.II’s twelve Browning .303 machine guns, the remaining four maintained for training purposes. The two seat trainer was opened to the wind, which made for harsh flying conditions in subzero weather and buffeting problems at high speeds. With the arrival of newer Soviet fighters, Hurricanes were transferred to glider towing and other second-line duties where they were flown to scrap.

The end came on June 13, 1944, at Lipetsk, when the last of the 9th Fighter Aviation Regiment’s Hurricanes plowed into a wheat field and killed the pilot.



I’m a big Hurricane fan, though Corgi’s rendition of the warbird is a tiny bit crude. A joint line that circumscribes the engine cowling just aft the exhaust stubs bears a striking resemblance to the Grand Canyon. Still, it’s a great little model, and I recommend it to any and all Battle of Britain aficionados.



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Old 05-09-2017, 10:36 AM   #413
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Long ago I spoke to an old warhorse of a pilot, Lt. Col. J. M. Collings USAF (RET), who shared a few of his Korean War experiences. Jerry passed on recently, but I’m sure he wouldn’t mind if I shared one of them with you.

Jerry was twenty-two at the time, bright-eyed and rarin’ to knock the livin’ shiznip out of some MiG-15s. He’d trained on F-86As back at Nellis Air Force Base and fell in love with the swift, swept-wing Sabre, sharpening his gunnery and flying skills to a razorblade edge. But upon arriving in Korea in late 1952, the Air Force assigned him to the old F-80 Shooting Star instead, which he flew in air-to-ground missions along the demilitarized zone, shattering bridges, rail yards, and tank and artillery emplacements. We’re talkin’ one unhappy camper.

Months later, and to Jerry’s immense joy, his group transitioned out of Shooting Stars and into new F-86Fs—but ironically found himself doing exactly what he’d done before—bombing ground targets! And for apparently good reasons: The “F” model could move its fanny in and out of target zones lickety-split, faster than the F-80, which presented a huge tactical advantage. Plus the F-86F was an exceptionally stable gun platform, a handy feature when strafing and butchering North Korean regulars. And … even when lumbered with a buttload of ordnance, the jet remained as nimble and spry as ever. Chasing and shooting MiGs into incandescent aluminum haze would have to wait. Jerry said his 51st combat mission was a real heartburn.

By then he’d become a flight leader, and one morning when reporting in at operations he spotted the name "Morgan" penciled in as the Number Four man in his flight. Figuring this was a squadron newbie Jerry hadn’t met yet, he was shocked to learn it was actually Brigadier General Morgan, the base commander—a tough old jockstrap with a foul disposition. The old man routinely chewed on pilots’ egos and swallowed them like soggy chaws of tobacco. Upon hearing this, Jerry shriveled as ice spread through his stomach. And as if that weren’t bad enough, the target that day was the railroad marshalling yards in the Wonsan Valley, crammed to the gills with anti-aircraft batteries. The gunners there were good—as in really good—having swatted down a shedload of hotshot American pilots. But Jerry wasn’t so much concerned about the perilous mission as screwing up in front of the General. That, and/or Morgan himself getting shot down and spending his days in a North Korean hell hole, plotting Jerry’s summary execution.

The flight to the target area proved uneventful, mercifully. General Morgan was unusually quiet throughout, having asked few if any questions back at base. Apparently the old fart was spooked, which made Jerry smirk. It was a pleasure to see him vulnerable for once.

Each Sabre hefted two 500 pound bombs per wing, flying at 15,000 feet. The plan was to dive in a trail formation, pickle the bombs, and then reform at 10,000 feet for home. As the flight circled the target and Jerry conferred with a T-6 spotter plane, ack-ack fire erupted in livid black bursts hundreds of feet below. Typically, the first Sabre to drop down the throat was the luckiest, largely because the gunners hadn’t accurately adjusted for speed and opened fire too late, spraying the air behind. Artillery tightened up with the second man and so on until the fourth jet dove in—when all hell exploded. Today was no different.

Jerry, as flight leader, dove in first and dropped his load, blowing a locomotive and several cars to hell and gone. As expected, the ack-ack fell way behind his flight path; but pulling off the target at around 500 feet and zigzagging, he saw the valley come alive with muzzle flashes. Having missed him, the North Koreas were hell bent on drubbing the other three planes, getting closer with each successive jet, each Sabre toggling its ordinance and then clawing its way to safety. Which left General Morgan all alone, the last guy down. To his credit, the old man lined up perfectly, a real pro; but he hesitated a little before starting his dive. When he did, all the ack-ack in the universe exploded around him, balls of 37mm rounds bursting everywhere, salvos choking the sky with black puffs and red inferno. Still, the Sabre bored in, dropped its bombs, blew part of the station to kindling, and climbed out—unscathed. The color drained form Jerry’s face.

Back at base, the General was overjoyed. The flight had decimated a good portion of the yard and damaged two anti-aircraft emplacements. The old guy laid much of the success at Jerry’s doorstep, hardly able to express his pleasure. It came as no surprise then when General Morgan promoted Jerry to Major and later shepherded his career to even greater heights. The General was noticeably easier to get along with, too.

Jerry was just happy to make it out of the war alive.




Hobby Master, once again, produced a primo model with its HA4308 Canadair Sabre Mk.6 Black Tulip. Not a whole lot to say except that it’s a terrific lookin’ little model, clean, superbly rendered, inspirational even. If you’ve got a yen for shimmering, lustrous, ex-Nazi pilot mounts, this is your baby.


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Old 05-10-2017, 10:31 AM   #414
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Amazingly, the USAF finally pulled its head out of its rear-end and recognized the Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II as a crucial battlefield asset (read: a ball-busting, dog-chewing, taken-no-prisoners monster). In so many words, Air Force Materiel Command chief Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski recently told Aviation Week that her command will sustain the aircraft “indefinitely.” Meaning, the A-10 won’t hobble into retirement for a couple more decades. Ain’t that terrific news?!!! No more codswallop about kicking the “Hawg” under the bus. The ol’ A-10 is back in business, all because the Pentagon finally figured it needs a strapping Gatling gun of a plane to knock the livin’ shiznip out of America’s enemies.
...

Most of you guys know this stuff already, but the Warthog is a single-seat, low-wing, straight-wing aircraft with two non-afterburning turbofan engines mounted high behind the wing in front of an empennage sporting twin vertical stabilizers. Some folks think (and not incorrectly) that the A-10 was designed around its 30 mm GAU-8 Avenger rotary cannon, yet the jet’s design logic transcends its nasty, fire-spittin’ nose gun: The A-10's large, unswept, high-aspect ratio wing and large ailerons give it excellent low-speed, low-altitude maneuverability, plus the wing allows for short takeoffs and landings, a downright handy feature considering this plane frequently deploys to primitive forward airfields. In addition, the wing skin isn't load-bearing, so improvised materials can replace damaged skin sections when necessary.

Those General Electric TF-34-GE-100 engines produce 9000 pounds of thrust each. Their location not only safeguards them from foreign objects ingested from unprepared runways but also directs exhaust over the tailplane, screening both power plants from infrared surface-to-air missiles. The fact that these engines more or less hug the aircraft's centerline makes in-flight recovery easier if one fails, too. And talk about pilot protection: A “bathtub” of titanium shields the A-10's cockpit and portions of its flight control system, engineered to survive direct hits from armor-piercing projectiles up 23 mm. The front windscreen and canopy resist small arms fire, too. And double-redundant hydraulic flight systems plus a mechanical setup work even if the hydraulics are shot out. This armor and systems redundancy are genuine life savers: Capt. Kim Campbell survived an air support mission near Baghdad in 2003 after ground fire punched holes in her A-10’s starboard vertical stabilizer, horizontal stabilizer, aft fuselage, and engine. The Warthog shuddered and rolled left and downward out of control; but Campbell engaged the backup mechanical flight controls, leveled her wings, and eventually landed at a forward base.

Yet one more vital feature about this herculean beast of an aircraft: It's adaptable. Because Fairchild designed the A-10 with rudimentary, Spartan conditions in mind, many of the warbird’s parts are swappable, including its engines, main landing gear, and vertical stabilizers. The A-10 can also lumber a buttload of armament on its 11 wing stations, including general purpose bombs, cluster bomb units, laser guided bombs, joint direct attack munitions (JDAM), wind corrected munitions dispenser (WCMD), AGM-65 Maverick and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles, 2.75 inch rockets, and illumination flares. But even loaded to the gills, the Warthogs’ real celebrity revolves around its Gatlin gun. The seven-barrel GAU-8 Avenger measures nine feet long and fires 30mm armor-piercing shells housed in a six-foot-diameter drum, representing about 16 percent of the aircraft's weight. When ground crews remove the gun for maintenance, the Hawg’s nose tips up unless something supports its tail. The weapon itself spits shells at a rate of 3900 rounds per minute; anything in its way disintegrates.

I could go on and on—but you get the picture.

The Warthog is one hellofa ground-support aircraft, proven in combat, tried, tested, and adored. It won its place on the battlefield, and thank goodness somebody figured out the A-10 isn’t an antiquated dud after all. Quite the contrary, the A-10 is a snortin’ pig of a warrior that won’t compromise, won’t book it, won’t ditch the troops under pressure. It saved a hugemongous number of lives in Afghanistan and Iraq and will likely continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

Viva la Warthog!!!



I'm sure you can tell, I’m a big A-10 fan. I love this bird, even got to strap one on once. I love both Corgi’s and Hobby Master’s versions; but since this is about the Hobby Master HA1312, I’ll simply say that if you don’t own this model (and others like her), you've missed the boat. The Warthog makes for an awesome model, and your collection isn’t complete without one.


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Old 05-10-2017, 11:49 AM   #415
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When is you gonna do a review on the Dragon Warbirds F4U Corsair fighters, these fine models were IMO the best in 1:72 and are hard to come by these days...

http://www.diecastaircraftforum.com/...80641494427704
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Old 05-10-2017, 04:46 PM   #416
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When is you gonna do a review on the Dragon Warbirds F4U Corsair fighters, these fine models were IMO the best in 1:72 and are hard to come by these days...

http://www.diecastaircraftforum.com/...80641494427704
Keep your eyes peeled for tomorrow's write-up, Surinam.
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Old 05-10-2017, 09:28 PM   #417
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Both Sabre and Thunderbolt are both great planes and among the best diecast models out there - they also enjoy two great write ups
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Old 05-10-2017, 09:48 PM   #418
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i like the warthog write up. again, not the sexiest of planes, but it's brutish firepower makes it one heck of an intimidating opponent. i'm sure you wouldn't want to be caught in a relatively slow moving tin can with a turret when this bird comes along...
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Old 05-11-2017, 10:21 AM   #419
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Gonna throw out a thank you to my two good buddies, tker76 and tomcatter, for their support and kind words. Thank you, guys! You’re the best!

Rex B. Beisel designed the Vought F4U Corsair, and it raised eyebrows almost from moment it left the drafting table. Powered by the experimental Pratt & Whitney XR2800-4, 18 cylinder Double Wasp engine, putting out 1,800 hp, the prototype XF4U-1 became the first U.S. single-engined fighter to break the 400 mph barrier (405 mph, 1st October, 1940). This kind of speed was unheard of in a navy fighter, given its additional weight to cope with deck landings and extra equipment. Understandably, the U.S. Navy was itching to deploy the beast on its Fleet Carriers.

But unforeseen difficulties during flight testing kept that from happening at first. The Corsair's cranked wing was sorta weird: A short wing section angled sharply downwards (anhedral) from the fuselage, then bent at an upwards angle (dihedral), assuming a 'reverse gull-wing' profile, which not only produced less drag but also helped to accommodate the fighter's gargantuan Hamilton Standard 13 feet, 6 inch diameter propeller. This wing form provided a skosh more room between the prop and the flattop's deck while still allowing for shorter, sturdier undercarriage struts necessary for more stable carrier landings. The problem was, the short oleos caused the F4U to bounce badly when it hit carrier decks, whereupon the warbird would vault over stretched arrestor wires and skid headlong into other fighters spotted near the carrier’s bow. The outcome, as you can imagine, was calamitous.

Aerodynamics posed another seemingly insoluble problem. The Corsair’s nose was so bloody long, pilots could barely see the deck and were forced to fly a curving, banked course on carrier approach, which repeatedly caused the starboard wing to stall, whereupon the aircraft would straightaway whirl into the sea. If a pilot abruptly applied full throttle to recover, engine torque from the Double Wasp would flip the Corsair over with fatal results. So many pilots croaked this way, the US Navy eagerly handed the F4U to the Marines to fly from land bases.

Enter the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm.

At the start of WW2, the FAA was saddled with anachronisms like the Gloster Gladiator biplane, due in part to the Royal Air Force having maintained control of the Fleet Air Arm until 29th May, 1939. The Fairey Fulmar and Sea Hurricane soldiered on as stop-gaps, but the British badly needed modern American naval fighters—and fast. Grumman Wildcats (initially named the Martlet) and Hellcats (RN name, Gannet) served with the fleet, but the Royal Navy was enormously willing to accept the Corsair, too. To fit F4Us into British carrier hangars (which featured lower headroom due to substantial armored decks), Chance Vought shaved 16 total inches from the F4U's wing, which also increased the Corsair's roll rate. In a stroke of genius, the Brits installed a variable-rate bleed valve to the fighter's struts that tamed its dreaded deck bounce plus a small stall strip on the starboard wing leading edge that corrected the warbird’s stall characteristics (good on ya, Brits! ).

FAA Corsair squadrons were the first into combat on 3rd April 1944, flying top-cover for Fairey Barracudas deployed against the German battleship Tirpitz in Norwegian waters. The Royal Navy was well pleased with their new fighter and transferred more squadrons to the British Pacific Fleet, where they clobbered Japanese islands and installations alongside their US Navy and Marine cousins.



I’ve included two Corsairs here for your pleasure, one from Corgi, an RNAAF F4U, which I think is a real crowd pleaser, and a Dragon Wings Corsair (which my friend Surinam Air 747 kinda requested yesterday). Both are top drawer, both represent their respective manus’ model expertise and competency. Personally, I like the Corgi better simply because it looks more meaty, a little more substantial (love those blown cowl flaps). The Dragon Wings is no slouch, either: It features a more velvety finish (if I can use that word without somebody smirking), which many collectors seem to favor. Both are keepers. The quality, accuracy, and availability tags below apply to both models, except
the Dragon Wings' Corsair is far more difficult to find.













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Old 05-11-2017, 12:44 PM   #420
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Thank you for the in depth review @ Rightofen, first you did the cool review on the Corgi P-47 Thunderbolt and now you just blow me away with this surprise review about the Dragon Warbirds F4U Corsair... the Dragon Warbirds Corsair together with the Dragon Warbirds P-47 Thunderbolt are both my favorite propeller engine fighters in the smaller 1:72... IMO the Dragon Warbirds P-47 beats the Corgi's P-47 in many aspects, notably the overall shape of the Dragon P-47 fuselage, wings, canopy & front engine inlet seem more correctly shaped than the corgi version but again we all prefer or own favorite Diecast models...
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Paris was the greatest city on earth! Vive la France! Tokyo 2020!

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Old 05-11-2017, 01:00 PM   #421
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the 80's series "baa bas black sheep" made the corsair a must have in my collection. oddly though, i actually passed on a pappy boyington bird in favour of the skull and crossbones. i also have the white 530... both by hobbymaster. the chequered nose did me in. they're definitely huge birds in any ww2 collection (as are most radial engine fighters?).
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Old 05-11-2017, 07:09 PM   #422
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Thank you for the in depth review @ Rightofen, first you did the cool review on the Corgi P-47 Thunderbolt and now you just blow me away with this surprise review about the Dragon Warbirds F4U Corsair... the Dragon Warbirds Corsair together with the Dragon Warbirds P-47 Thunderbolt are both my favorite propeller engine fighters in the smaller 1:72... IMO the Dragon Warbirds P-47 beats the Corgi's P-47 in many aspects, notably the overall shape of the Dragon P-47 fuselage, wings, canopy & front engine inlet seem more correctly shaped than the corgi version but again we all prefer or own favorite Diecast models...
My pleasure, Surinam. I’ve got to admit, Dragon Wings really did produce some fabulous models; and to this day I’m still puzzled why it didn’t grow its business more. Way back when, Corgi was its only real competitor—before Hobby Master, Witty, and others joined the show.

If I have one criticism about Dragon Wings, it’s that its models featured too many annoying fiddly bits. That, and the undercarriage pins bent like putty, splaying the landing gear. Other than that, the models were works of art.
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Old 05-11-2017, 10:56 PM   #423
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My pleasure, Surinam. I’ve got to admit, Dragon Wings really did produce some fabulous models; and to this day I’m still puzzled why it didn’t grow its business more. Way back when, Corgi was its only real competitor—before Hobby Master, Witty, and others joined the show.

If I have one criticism about Dragon Wings, it’s that its models featured too many annoying fiddly bits. That, and the undercarriage pins bent like putty, splaying the landing gear. Other than that, the models were works of art.

the struts on 72 scale ww2 birds are generally very fine and easily prone to snapping/bending. they're pretty sturdy on 48 birds though. again, personal preference, i suppose...
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Old 05-11-2017, 11:23 PM   #424
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Hey Dave, another great post and one I particularly enjoyed as right now there is a Corgi Corsair en route to me from eBay (DAC user chairman_milo has been selling a great collection of models off, from which I was lucky enough to snag my "whispering death" ), my first Corsair.

I am getting the Korean War USMC Cpt Jesse Folmar release, which is exactly what I needed to fill out my Korean War theme!

This has really whet my appetite and I can't wait for it to wing its way to me
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Old 05-12-2017, 11:31 AM   #425
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Hey Dave, another great post and one I particularly enjoyed as right now there is a Corgi Corsair en route to me from eBay (DAC user chairman_milo has been selling a great collection of models off, from which I was lucky enough to snag my "whispering death" ), my first Corsair.
I am getting the Korean War USMC Cpt Jesse Folmar release, which is exactly what I needed to fill out my Korean War theme!
This has really whet my appetite and I can't wait for it to wing its way to me
That’s great news, Tker76. You’ll love it!

I should have mentioned in my review that MRC Easy Model’s 1/72 Corsairs are fantastic, too. They’re plastic (which may or may not be a good thing depending on your predilection), and they come with extended undercarriage only; but they’re terrific little replicas with a lot of heart. Plus they’re blessedly inexpensive (comparatively); so for collectors wishing to own some quality F4Us without bankrupting themselves, I highly recommend them. I relish my rather sizeable collection of Easy Models and plan to buy many more.

If you’re interested, take a gander at a mouth-watering Easy Model F4U lineup here (Corsairs are located toward the bottom of the vendor's page).

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Old 05-12-2017, 01:42 PM   #426
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here's my modest collection of the corsair for your viewing pleasure...

Gone but Not Forgotten-2017-05-13-00-39-02.jpg

Gone but Not Forgotten-2017-05-13-00-38-25.jpg
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Old 05-12-2017, 03:48 PM   #427
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Nice catch, tomcatter! Models to be proud of. Now ... grab a whole bunch more!!!
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Old 05-12-2017, 09:36 PM   #428
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Nice catch, tomcatter! Models to be proud of. Now ... grab a whole bunch more!!!
pappy boyington's ride is still in sight... but sadly, availability pretty much 0/5
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Old 05-15-2017, 12:20 PM   #429
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When the MiG-29 made its debut, it was pretty impressive. It proudly represented Russia’s first fourth-generation jet fighter, sleek and deadly, fast and agile; it could out-turn any NATO fighter and was armed to the teeth with cutting-edge missiles. But imprudently, she was a blend of fourth generation engineering with third generation hardware, making her something of a weak sister in Russia’s military family.

The MiG-29 began development in 1974, designed to be an advanced lightweight multi-role fighter able to work from primitive, front-line airfields while heavier Su-27s flew fly longer-range missions. The first MiG-29 became operational in 1982, codenamed “Fulcrum”; and by good fortune, Western pilots became well acquainted with the bird by the 1990s, flying Germany's newly acquired East German examples. The United States eventually bought twenty-one from Moldova.

The MiG-29’s twin RD-33 turbofan engines furnish excellent acceleration and a top speed of Mach 2.25—faster than the F-16 but slightly slower than the larger F-15. The MiG-29’s chief asset is its superlative maneuverability, able to outperform the light-footed F-16 in both instantaneous and sustained turns (twenty-eight degree per second versus twenty-six). To their dismay, NATO pilots practicing against German Air Force Fulcrums found that at low speeds in short-range dogfights, the MiG-29 was far superior. In fact, the Fulcrum is supermaneuverable—able to execute maneuvers owing to its excellent handling characteristics. It can also attain very high angles of attack.

Another MiG-29 asset is its short-range R-73 infrared-guided missile that a pilot can aim and fire through his helmet-mounted sight. Normally a jet has to point at an enemy fighter to target it; but with the R-73, the driver need only look at a target within a frontal arc of sixty degrees and shoot, an ability the U.S. Air Force did not acquire until 2003. In addition, the Fulcrum’s seven hardpoints can carry R-27 medium-range missiles and older R-60 types; some are upgraded to fire R-77 long-range air-to-air missiles. The Fulcrum can heft up to eight thousand pounds of air-to-ground munitions.

The MiG-29 can operate from unprepared airstrips and not ingest debris owing to its specially designed air intakes. Which, added to its other strengths, makes for a world-beating fighter; but in truth, the Fulcrum suffers from core design limitations that knock it off that perch. While aerodynamically dazzling, the MiG-29 doesn’t (or didn’t) include modern pilot displays, controls, and fly-by-wire avionics. Fulcrum pilots are/were forced to stare at their cockpit instruments far more than their Western counterparts blessed with modern Head’s Up Displays; not to mention, the throttle isn’t integrated into the stick. Plus the MiG-29’s sensors are/were modest: its N019 Phazotron pulse-doppler radar has a shorter accurate range (thirty-eight miles) than the missiles it carries. And its infrared sensor (IRST) is likewise limited. The German Air Force felt these handicaps were so daunting, it retired its entire Fulcrum fleet though the Russian jet was more agile than its F-4s and Tornados. Limited range also plagues the MiG-29, where it can fly no farther than nine hundred miles on internal fuel, further inhibited by lack of inflight refueling. While the Fulcrum appeals to less-monied countries anxious over border conflicts, it's far less beguiling to air forces looking to project power over distance.

Finally, like most Soviet-era fighters, the MiG-29 wasn’t designed with longevity in mind—just two thousand five hundred hours compared to six thousand typical of U.S. fighters. MiG-29 airframes deteriorate rapidly with age and require extensive and expensive maintenance. Malaysia reported it spends $5 million per year per MiG-29 to keep them flyable.

The Fulcrum's latest incarnation, the MiG-29M, however, is a much more capable aircraft, upgraded with modern electronics, heads-up displays, and improved missiles; but buyers are few. Owing to its added weight, the bird is slower that earlier marks and doesn’t fly as high. Still it’s a formidable opponent, and any air force flying them can potentially play ball with the big boys.


Though it was unpopular to say so years ago, Witty was actually a pretty good diecast manufacturer, even great occasionally. It didn’t measure up to Corgi and Hobby Master for prestige, but the manu’s product, mostly, was praiseworthy. If you can find one of its Mig-29 Fulcums, you might want to grab it. They look good, they’re well built, they’re tolerably accurate, and they make for great additions to anybody’s Russian/Soviet aircraft collection. The polka dot theme on this particular Indian bird is rather intriguing.


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Old 05-15-2017, 09:45 PM   #430
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i agree. used to dislike the fiddly struts on the witty fulcrum... but now that jcw has done away with them, i must admit, i kinda miss those struts. with the jcw fulcrums, it appears as if the struts have fallen off
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:06 PM   #431
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Though there’s no record of what pilot Hauptmann Alfred Fischer and crew thought when an American P-38 Lightning shredded his Fw-200 Condor to tiny bits over Iceland on August 14, 1942, it’s easy to guess. The P-38 came straight on, fast and terrifyingly powerful, ripping the Nazi patrol bomber to bits. The Germans had never seen the distinctive design before, its twin tails, its fuselage pod, its two thundering engines. They didn’t have much time to mull it over anyway, ‘cause the Lightning dispatched the Condor in seconds, marking the first successful American engagement of a German aircraft during World War II.

Within six months and two-thousand miles away, the P-38 again proved its versatility, witnessed by a lone hysterical German pilot who surrendered to soldiers at an Allied camp near Tunisia, North Africa, pointing to the sky sputtering one phrase—“der Gableschwanz Teufl”—over and over. Once U.S. officials translated the words, they grasped what the petrified man was saying: A P-38 had nailed him right up the gazoo, a “fork-tailed devil.”

My impression is that most American WWII fighter aficionados shove the P-38 behind the P-51 Mustang for status and celebrity, probably behind the P-47 Thunderbolt, too. Which is their prerogative, but what they don’t understand is, the Lightning was a legend in its own right and deserves as much respect as its more famous brethern (and maybe more).

Why? I’ll explain …

First conceived in 1937 by Lockheed chief engineer Hall L. Hibbard and his then assistant, Clarence “Kelly” Johnson, the twin-boomed P-38 was the most groundbreaking plane of its day, merging speed with unprecedented innovations: two supercharged engines and a lethal mix of four 50-caliber machine guns and a 20-mm cannon amassed in its nose. The resulting speed and firepower were stupendous.

Upon its official introduction in 1940, the P-38 could climb to 3,300 feet in a single minute and reach 400 mph, 100 mph faster than any other fighter in the world. It also had long legs, able to fly 1,150 miles, making it an intimidating long-range threat. Plus, it could carry a larger payload than early B-17s. Furthermore, the Lightning’s versatility and ruggedness were legendary: It could sink ships, trash armor columns, demolish tanks, annihilate entrenched pillboxes, and shoot down fighters and bombers with ease.

Apparently top Army Air Force brass grooved on the P-38, because when they required a long-range battle-tested airplane to fly America’s first round-trip mission to Berlin, they chose a modified P-38. Likewise, when code breakers learned that Japanese admiral Isoroku Yamamoto (architect of the attack on Pearl Habor) was making a key inspection flight in the Pacific, they threw sixteen P-38s at him, each flying nearly 1,000 miles. After they nailed the admiral’s butt, Japanese naval spirit plunged while Allied morale soared. The intercept greatly assisted in America’s victory in the Pacific.

As a World War II fighter, the Lightning’s legacy is unparalleled. Lockheed produced more than 10,000 P-38s—in 18 distinct models during the war, flying more than 130,000 missions in theaters worldwide. P-38 pilots shot down more than Japanese than any other American fighter and, as a reconnaissance aircraft, produced 90 percent of the aerial film taken over Europe. Perhaps Colonel Ben Kelsey, a P-38 test pilot, summed up the war bird’s legacy the best. “(That) comfortable old cluck,” he said, “would fly like hell, fight like a wasp upstairs, and land like a butterfly. We couldn't have won the war without her.”



For my money, Corgi’s P-38 Lightning is just about perfect—all but that horrifying joint line scoring its nose just forward the windscreen. Other than that, she’s a looker. Something about those twin booms and that insectoid fuselage pod does it for me (I don’t mind that tiddly-widdly, pintsized Perspex nose cone on this particular issue, either. Purty cool). If you’ve been holding back on a Corgi P-38, don’t. I absolutely guarantee, you’ll love it.

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Old 05-16-2017, 12:35 PM   #432
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I would buy a P-38 in a heartbeat. Were it in 1/48 scale tho but William from HM is keeping my hopes up as he said that P-38 in 1/48 is very high on their list of to-do planes. But first, we will get a Zero in 1/48.
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Old 05-16-2017, 12:50 PM   #433
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I would buy a P-38 in a heartbeat. Were it in 1/48 scale tho but William from HM is keeping my hopes up as he said that P-38 in 1/48 is very high on their list of to-do planes. But first, we will get a Zero in 1/48.
1/48 zero? YES!!!
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Old 05-16-2017, 04:00 PM   #434
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I recently replaced my Corgi P38J 'Marge' with a Matchbox P38J 'Mama's Boy'. Other than being gears up only I actually prefer Matchbox's rendition.
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Old 05-16-2017, 05:15 PM   #435
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You know, I should have mentioned Franklin Mint 1/48 Lightnings. Believe me, they're fabulous models; and if you're a P-38 aficionado, you really ought to buy one or two.

Ten years ago I sold my entire Matchbox collection, two P-38s among them, and wish I hadn't. Matchbox produced a terrific, accurate Lightning, arguably better than Corgi's. But the manu was clueless about growing the collection. Had they done that, I would have kept my stash.

Might as well comment on Witty's P-38s, too, 'cause they're pretty hot. Not as good as Corgi Lightnings IMHO, but they'll do in a pinch.
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Old 05-16-2017, 05:35 PM   #436
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Corgi P-38s are excellent. I wish they wouldn't have canceled two previously planned models (especially AA36608 'Haleakala'). I'd much rather see HM do them in 1/72, personally.
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Old 05-17-2017, 12:25 PM   #437
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For those of us who don't already know, the Harrier (or Harrier Jump Jet), was/is a family of jet-powered attack aircraft capable of vertical/short takeoff and landing operations (V/STOL). In the 1960s, Hawker Siddeley created the only truly successful V/STOL design, giving the RAF the unprecedented, tactically sexy advantage of flying from car parks and forest clearings, etc., sans airstrips. The Royal Navy, itself impressed, adapted the warbird for its own use (dubbed the Sea Harrier).

To achieve up-and-down flight, however, trade-offs had to be made in terms of endurance, bomb-load capacity, and operational radius. Accordingly, it was clear early on that the Harrier’s warload was severely limited as was its combat radius owing to the jet's Rolls Royce Pegasus Engine, which devoured fuel faster than your Grandma Gezelda guzzles Gala Margaritas. That, and the jet proved unsteady during vertical takeoffs and landings, killing a bunch of RAF, Royal Navy, and US Marine Corp pilots. The warbird's benefits were hugely appealing, but getting it to hover faultlessly proved daunting.

Enter the McDonnell Douglas AV-8B "Harrier" II, the Harrier’s American vertical takeoff-and-landing offspring. This scion was what the Harrier was originally meant to be, a balls-out bad boy able to land practically anywhere, lug heavy warloads, and fly extended missions. It features vastly improved stability, cutting-edge electronics, a glass cockpit, night attack mounted pulsed-Doppler radar, and the ability to lug your grannie’s SUV and everybody in it.

None of which was easy to accomplish, however, given that McDonnell D engineers were forced to preserve (mostly) the size and shape of the original jet, which mandated keeping the engine. Which was doable, except the Pegasus powerplant could produce only so much thrust (and thus lifting power). So the company hatched a clever solution: Make the fuselage and wings out of graphite composite materials, which were lighter than aluminum but stronger than steel; enlarge the wing; give the new jet bigger fuel tanks and more suspension points; throw in a ton more improvements (with the effect of vastly improving stability), and Voilà! The Harrier II was born. In 1981, British Aerospace went all agog over the new jet and wanted a piece of the action, positioning itself as a subcontractor and thus pulling the British government back into the Harrier program. Production began in 1983, McDonnell Douglas building 60 percent of the aircraft; British Aerospace the remaining 40. The AV-8B entered service with the US Marines in late 1983 and later (as the GR.5) with the RAF.

Improvements kept coming. All kinds of follow-on modifications perfected the beast, especially Marine Corp Harrier IIs. The AV-8B Night Attack version rolled off the assembly line during the ‘80s with IR FLIR sensors used in tandem with night vision goggles. In June 1987, British Aerospace and McDonnell Douglas modified the Harrier II with pulsed-Doppler radar AN/APG-65 (similar to that used on McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet), which allowed the aircraft to locate the enemy and dogfight more effectively.

By December 2010, budgetary pressures forced the early retirement of all British Harrier IIs. The decision shocked the nation as no immediate fixed-wing, carrier-capable aircraft were available to take its place; but proponents argued that the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II would shortly supersede it—which, as of this writing, hasn't happened. US Marine Corp AV-8B Harrier IIs soldier on with a variety of updates that keep it high-tech. Navy brass paint a rosy future for the jump jet, suggesting it’ll stay in service until 2020 (and possibly far beyond). After that, the Navy will replace it with vertical and short takeoff versions of the F-35 joint strike fighter (which to many observers, including me, is a brainless mistake).



Shoot me, but I never took a fancy to either the Harrier or Harrier II, so I'm not exactly qualified to make pertinent comments about this model except to say that I like it, and Hobby Master did a terrific job on it accuracy, paint, and emblem wise. For those with a yen for jets that jump straight up and literally land on a dime, this one's for you!

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Old 05-17-2017, 09:35 PM   #438
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Another pair of great posts Dave, I am constantly impressed with the care and effort that goes into these.

I actually have the GR.7 pictured too - not a first, but not common (at least insofar as specific releases foes, if not moulds which I have done a bit better on)
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Old 05-18-2017, 05:37 AM   #439
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This must be one of those super contributor super threads someone was talking about

Great work again Dave, I wonder how many times you've been responsible for collectors hunting down these gems
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:25 AM   #440
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Thanks for your kind words, UF and Tker76. You've made my day!
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Old 05-18-2017, 12:05 PM   #441
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This must be one of those super contributor super threads someone was talking about

Great work again Dave, I wonder how many times you've been responsible for collectors hunting down these gems
can't speak for the rest but he's influenced me on quite a number of times
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Old 05-18-2017, 04:12 PM   #442
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can't speak for the rest but he's influenced me on quite a number of times
Tomcatter, my friend ... if you go bankrupt from buying old models—for heaven sakes don’t blame me!!!

Something I’ve noticed this last year or so: A number of old-timey veteran diecast collectors are pulling out, selling all or part their hard-won collections. This gives newbies a chance to own some terrific older models, which in many cases were better made, better rendered, and are better liked than the new stuff. Sometimes the prices are affordable, too (though the majority hover somewhere north of reasonable).

For DA.C members who want to flesh out their collections, I highly recommend digging through eBay regularly. I do that religiously even though I own a sizeable (we’re talking HUGE) collection; you’d be surprised what pops up now and again. Several weeks ago I won a Dragon Armor 1/72 Sherman I thought I’d never see, so hang in there. Somewhere down the road you’ll find exactly what you’re looking for.
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:25 PM   #443
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Ok everyone, send Dave's details to your wives so they can properly roast him

Just on that part about veterans pulling out, I've notice that also, some BIG time collectors selling almost the lot

It's the cycle of zinc life Veteran passes down to newbies and the hobby keeps rolling. It's often amazing how much cheaper absolutely stunning older models sell for compared to similar current releases.

Score with the Sherman, as a Dragon Armour collector, I know just how rare that is and how much better Dragons original stuff was, crazy detailed and made to almost perfection for the low price of $20, how they did that and manage to employ extremely talented labour compared to today's standards is beyond belief, those skilled workers were worth 10x as much as they were getting paid.
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Old 05-19-2017, 12:15 PM   #444
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Something about this bird inspires me, makes me envisage German pilots decked out in rakish, black-leather jackets, stylish tunics, white shirts, matching peaked caps, and iron crosses arrayed around their necks. All of which sounds more like Luftwaffe togs, not Kriegsmarine kit; but if Arado Ar-196 pilots didn’t wear uniforms matching this, they should have.

Wanna hear a few interesting facts about this warplane? Of course you do.

Arado initially presented two versions of this memorable aircraft, one bearing a central float with two small outriggers, the other with two floats. Laboratory testing failed to decisively prove that one structure was significantly better than the other, though the single float withstood rough seas better because it was attached directly to the fuselage, the sturdiest part of the warbird. The twin float arrangement offered more stability, however, when taxiing and maneuvering. Weight and drag were basically the same. For whatever reasons, the Reichs Air Ministry Technical Office (RLM) chose the two-float version.

For punching power, production Ar 196 were no pushovers (like that alliteration?), well-armed with one 20 mm MG FF cannon in each wing, a 7.9mm MG 17 forward-firing machine gun in the fuselage nose, and one or two 7.9mm flexible guns in the aft cockpit. The floatplane could also haul a 50 kg (110 lb) bomb under each wing.

The Arado Ar 196 first put to sea aboard the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee when the commerce raider set sail from Wilhelmshaven in August 1939; two Arados complimented the ship, launching from catapults set amidships. Flying the South Atlantic in search of merchant ships, the Ar 196s projected the battlecruiser's vision for hundreds of miles and located most of the battlecruiser's 11 British victims.

Would you believe that many Arados flew coastal patrol missions from land bases, too? Two Ar 196A-2s from Aalborg, Denmark, captured a British submarine, the HMS Seal, doing just that on May 5, 1940. The Seal was sewing mines in a narrow waterway called the Kattegat when it struck one of them. Spotting the large explosion plume, patrolling Arados attacked the sub with guns and bombs and inflicted such damage that the boat couldn’t submerge. One of the Arados, piloted by Kapitänleutnant Günther Buchheim, landed alongside the afflicted sub and demanded the vessel's surrender, which her captain indignantly obliged. Other Ar 196 units deployed around the Bay of Biscay intercepted and destroyed a number of RAF Whitley bombers attacking German U-boats sailing to and from their pens.

Because the Ar-196 was moderately slow and weakly armed comparatively, by mid to late war the Arado routinely fell to much more powerful, able Allied fighters. The warbird flew in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, the Mediterranean, Baltic, Aegean, Black, and North Seas, rendering, by all accounts, inestimable service to the German navy. By August 1944, the RLM terminated the Ar-196's production, ending with a production run of 526 aircraft. Romania and Bulgaria also flew bird to the end of the war.

Interestingly, when the US Navy took custody of Prinz Eugen, it was more engrossed with the catapult system used to launch the floatplane than the Ar 196 itself, but nonetheless saved the two aircraft. The NASM airplane has only 14 hours of operational flying time, U. S. Navy pilots adding just four more hours during testing and evaluation at the Naval Air Materiel Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.



Oxford issued this model, a compromise between quality, accuracy, and modest price. I’ll leave you to judge which of those concerns triumphed, but I quite like the bird if only because it’s the sole diecast Arado available (that I know of); and the price ain't bad, either. Oxford, apparently, is blessed with the guts and foresight necessary to produce affordable, semi-obscure warbirds like this one, and for that I applaud it. If the model's prop spinner wasn't so wonky, I'd say the manu produced a genuine prizewinner. So if you’re searching for the Kriegsmarine’s eyes, grab one of these little two-float honeys. You'll love it!

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Old 05-19-2017, 09:46 PM   #445
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Tomcatter, my friend ... if you go bankrupt from buying old models—for heaven sakes don’t blame me!!!

Something I’ve noticed this last year or so: A number of old-timey veteran diecast collectors are pulling out, selling all or part their hard-won collections. This gives newbies a chance to own some terrific older models, which in many cases were better made, better rendered, and are better liked than the new stuff. Sometimes the prices are affordable, too (though the majority hover somewhere north of reasonable).

For DA.C members who want to flesh out their collections, I highly recommend digging through eBay regularly. I do that religiously even though I own a sizeable (we’re talking HUGE) collection; you’d be surprised what pops up now and again. Several weeks ago I won a Dragon Armor 1/72 Sherman I thought I’d never see, so hang in there. Somewhere down the road you’ll find exactly what you’re looking for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukrainian_Falcons View Post
Ok everyone, send Dave's details to your wives so they can properly roast him

Just on that part about veterans pulling out, I've notice that also, some BIG time collectors selling almost the lot

It's the cycle of zinc life Veteran passes down to newbies and the hobby keeps rolling. It's often amazing how much cheaper absolutely stunning older models sell for compared to similar current releases.

Score with the Sherman, as a Dragon Armour collector, I know just how rare that is and how much better Dragons original stuff was, crazy detailed and made to almost perfection for the low price of $20, how they did that and manage to employ extremely talented labour compared to today's standards is beyond belief, those skilled workers were worth 10x as much as they were getting paid.
great catch, monsieur richstofen! yeah, lots of veteran collectors either thinning the herd or giving up their collection altogether and yes, they're pretty reasonable with their prices putting more emphasis on people who treasure their models than those who make flipping models their secondary (or primary?) source of income.

rare models do pop up on ebay occasionally but not too often... and rarely at reasonable prices. strangely you'd find little gems with a little more effort scouring individual country ebay sites especially uk's. they dont seem to pop up on the general ebay site somehow. most veteran collectors prefer dealing with fellow collectors directly though.
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Old 05-21-2017, 08:39 AM   #446
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Hey guys

First time poster and very new collector.

Just got a couple of Carousel1 1:48 models today.

Fokker Dr.1 Triplane Lt. Werner Voss

FW 190D Dora-13 Major Franz Gotz.

Not that many around from what I have seen so hopefully can track down a few more over time.
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Old 05-21-2017, 10:14 AM   #447
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Welcome, AussieGuy, and congrats on your finds! The two models you purchased are extremely difficult to find and highly sought after. A word of caution: Buying diecast models can become a slippery slope waaay too fast if you're not careful, so pace yourself. And if you're ever in the mood, send your DR.1 and Fw 190D my way: I'll take great care of 'em!
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Old 05-21-2017, 11:43 AM   #448
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Hey guys

First time poster and very new collector.

Just got a couple of Carousel1 1:48 models today.

Fokker Dr.1 Triplane Lt. Werner Voss

FW 190D Dora-13 Major Franz Gotz.

Not that many around from what I have seen so hopefully can track down a few more over time.
oh wow!!! what a way to start your collection!!! i'd love to have a carousel p40b the white 160 of george welch but alas... they're like -1/5 in terms of monsieur richtofen's availability scale
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Old 05-21-2017, 07:20 PM   #449
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Welcome, AussieGuy, and congrats on your finds! The two models you purchased are extremely difficult to find and highly sought after. A word of caution: Buying diecast models can become a slippery slope waaay too fast if you're not careful, so pace yourself. And if you're ever in the mood, send your DR.1 and Fw 190D my way: I'll take great care of 'em!
Thanks for the replies guys,

I don't know if I can multi quote so I am replying to you both.

I have absolutely no experience in this but when I first saw them they just stood out for some reason. I went home and checked a bit on the net and then went back to the place and bought them.

From what I can see I got them for an excellent price. He has 2 more of the Triplanes so I am thinking about getting them maybe to trade or something as these things seem pretty rare.

To the poster who was after the P40, I think I found one for sale on Ebay here but am struggling to find the listing again. I will have another look as, from the limited info I can find, the P40 was an excellent model.

The worst thing is I want to get them out and display them but am reluctant to due to their rarity.

If anyone has any links to info on the company or what was available I would be most appreciative.

Thanks for the warning as I am already starting to love these things and starting to hunt around. Bit of a worry considering that 2 weeks ago I didn't even know they existed.

Cheers guys.
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Old 05-22-2017, 10:59 AM   #450
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Gosh I love this old bird. And the funny thing is, I honest-to-goodness detested the Blackburn Buccaneer way back when for all of its gobstopping, portly repulsiveness. I mean, come on—the jet resembled a pregnant female hippo in a lace bikini (no offence to my British cousins). But somehow, someway, this damsel grew on me until now I count her among my favorite jets (and models). This baby totally rocks!

I’ll bet you didn’t know that beside it being a world-class strike platform, the Buccaneer was a superlative, stable recon aircraft, too, that hefted a reconnaissance pack in its capacious bomb bay. The capsule consisted of six F95 cameras arranged as a vertical fan of three with a further three sited as forward and sideways obliques. Buccs first employed the recon pack during the Beira patrols, flying from the HMS Eagle in 1966, photographing and identifying two tankers that attempted to break an oil blockade thrown around newly independent Rhodesia. The following year, Buccaneers carried reconnaissance packs over Aden to cover the final withdrawal of British forces.

Carrier service crews, in fact, often fitted Buccs with reconnaissance pods simply to keep aircrews current with the system. But for reasons known only to higher-ups, Royal Air Force Buccaneer squadrons (inheritors of the warbird) spurned Bucc reconnaissance missions in toto. Although RAF ground crews initially fitted recon packs to these mounts, they were never used (I’m still scratching my head over that one).

RAF Buccaneers also retained the Royal Navy’s arrestor hook and folding wings along with a bomb-bay fuel tank that increased fuel capacity by 425 imperial gallons. To further augment the bird’s effectiveness, RAF aircraft lugged around conventional iron bombs, nuclear weapons, and Martel anti-ship missiles. The problem was, the Royal Navy, ever the needy relative, never really updated the 1950’s design (nor did the RAF). The result being, by the 1980s the Buccaneer was positively antediluvian avionics wise and could consequently operate only at low-level in good weather. But hobbled as it was, it still mortified the USAF in the 1977 "Red Flag" competition held at Nellis AFB; the Yanks never saw them coming. Good ol’ Bucc!

In January 1991, years after the enfeebled old girl should have retired, six Buccs deployed to the Gulf War, where they assisted bomb-laden Tornados by identifying targets with their TIALD laser pods—and did a terrific job of it (when the pods actually worked). Which redounded badly on Defense-budget mismanagement, the fact that elderly, diaper-wearing Buccaneers were deployed at all owing to the Tornado’s (then) target-designating feebleness. The last Bucc retired from service at RAF Lossiemouth in 1994 among much handwringing and heartfelt lament.




You know, there’s something to be said for simplicity—at least in this case. The mono-grey finish on Corgi’s AA34105 Buccaneer is, for lack of a better word, striking. If I tried to execute the same with my dubious painting skills, I’d make a total hash of it, but not so Corgi’s accomplished technicians; their prowess is unmistakable. Until you see this model in the flesh, you’ll never know how extraordinary she looks. Not to mention, she’s just a hot lookin’ chic for all her corpulence. Grab it if you can. You won’t be sorry.

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